Sunday, July 3, 2016

How Do You Plan to Model AAC?

Apologies to any of you who missed me last week. I just never managed to get a post written.
I’m healing well enough (albeit a bit behind on muscle strength), but the rest of me - well, not so much. Sleep patterns are still totally disrupted and no sleep makes me….well, just plain out of it!
I seem to spend a lot of time sitting and just staring - at nothing in particular. But, day by day, it’s getting there.

So, this week, I vowed to be better tuned in and on top of things. I was only partially successful, but here I am on Friday putting together a post for this weekend.
It’s a big holiday weekend. Will any of you be around to read this? I, for one, have no plans. And I plan on keeping it that way.


Where ever you are let me help you plan your activities with the AAC user(s) you support, by offering up this simple planning sheet.
Aided Language Stimulation, Aided Input, whatever form of modeling you are doing with your AAC user, often requires some planning if it’s something you’re new to doing. Getting familiar with the aac system you’re going to be using is imperative, but sometimes easier said than done. So, with the though of integrating it one activity at a time, take the time to think about what words go with that activity. What words will you need to use? And don’t just plan for making choices or requests. Think about describing, commenting, asking questions.

Here is simple example, using my all-time favorite activity: blowing bubbles.
Until next week, keep on talking - and modeling!







6 comments:

  1. Bubbles are a great all around activity for little ones! Thanks for the tips!

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    1. I find that almost no matter how old my clients are, bubbles is a favorite!

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  2. Such clever ideas. I love the bubble theme, I know kids do too.

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  3. Bubbles is my "go to" activity for almost any age. Everyone loves bubbles. I can engage most kids for quite some times with just bubbles!

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  4. This is good to remember for when my daughter is older, thanks for sharing!

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    1. Start modeling AAC use as early as possible. I hope it works out well for her and you. Thanks for reading.

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